Since 1993:

•TRP has deconstructed over 2,000 houses and other buildings to salvage reusable materials.

•TRP has diverted over 350,000 tons of reusable materials from landfills.

•TRP has trained over 500 unemployed, underemployed and disadvantaged workers.

•TRP has trained over 71 contractors, who in turn create needed construction jobs.

Since 1993, architects, contractors and building owners have relied on TRP to keep reusable and recyclable building materials out of overburdened landfills. By de-constructing (instead of demolishing) a building, TRP is able to salvage up to 80 percent of the materials and channel them back into the marketplace through donations and sales at its network of retail outlets.


TRP offers the following green services and products:

Building materials donation and deconstruction • Building materials salvage • Building materials distribution • Great deals on reclaimed building materials and lumber • Project management • Training • Consulting services • Reuse and recycling plans

The Latest TRP News:

The ReUse People SpecialsThis year we’re not waiting for Spring to arrive before rolling out our annual Reuse Contest. Entries and feedback from previous years have made it abundantly clear that people need all the time they can get to plan and execute some of the amazing projects entered in the competition.

When we first introduced the Reuse Contest several years ago, our purpose was to promote the reuse of building materials and to give our customers an additional incentive to incorporate salvaged materials wherever possible when building, remodeling or creating signature products such as furniture and works of art. After starting in the San Francisco Bay Area, we quickly expanded to include the rest of California, and in 2012 went national.

The ReUse People SpecialsTRP reached a new plateau in 2013, due primarily to the drive and enthusiasm of our people.

The ReUse People SpecialsThe second annual National Reuse Contest came to a close on October 31, 2013, the last day for participating reuse stores to enter their local winners in the national competition. National winners were chosen in late November.

Before I divulge the winners, I’d like to thank the dozens of stores and store managers who participated in this year’s contest. The total number of entries more than doubled from 2012. Because of the excitement generated by this contest, and the number of people who wanted to enter but simply could not get their projects completed, TRP has decided to extend the entry period for next year’s contest from seven to 10 months and to launch the contest in January

The ReUse People SpecialsMany of us have great stories about the different and unique ways we or others have reused things. The following case involves the ingenious reuse of countless numbers of a single type of common item—wrenches.

One of our TRP advisors forwarded to me a series of photos of sculptures made from nothing but wrenches. I suspect it was one of those “Can you believe this?” items making rounds on the web. The artist is John Piccoli of Victoria, Australia. Locally, he is known as “The Spanner Man.” Spanner is the British and Australian word for what Americans call a monkey wrench.

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